Organ Diseases

Organ diseases are serious problems that halitosis could possibly signify. Some organ diseases include kidney disease and lung disease. These diseases are quite serious, and need immediate attention from the vet.

Kidney Disease

Kidney failure occurs in 9 out of every 1000 dogs, but mostly in older dogs. The kidney regulates many of the dog’s vital bodily functions, and a dysfunction is hard to detect until it may be too late.

Causes:

There are many reasons for kidney disease, including diabetes mellitus, genetics, bladder blockage, and some prescription medicines.

Symptoms:

Lung DiseaseSymptoms of kidney disease include vomiting, constipation or diarrhea, tiredness, and increased thirst or lack of appetite. As the disease gets worse, symptoms start to include severe weight loss, weight loss, blindness, and seizures.

Treatment:

If you feel like your dog may have kidney disease, immediately contact a vet. Your vet may be able to cure some of the symptoms to make the dog feel less uncomfortable. Your dog should be relieved of its dehydration, and possible put on a diet created to stabilize the disease.

Relation to Halitosis:

Kidney disease affects the main functioning of a dog’s internal system, including its blood levels. If there were a dysfunction with the dog’s kidney, its blood and hormonal system would be impacted, which would explain the smell of uncomfortable odors generating from the dog.

Lung Disease

Lung disease is another serious organ problem that need direct and immediate attention from a vet. This disease affects the dog’s lungs and respiratory system, impacting its ability to breathe and function normally.

Causes:

Lung disease is caused by a dysfunction in the lungs, which limits the amount of oxygen that can be inhaled by the dog. This dysfunction can be caused by bacteria, and may be transmitted through the air. It can also be caused by a problem in your dog’s diet.

Symptoms:

Kidney DiseaseSymptoms of lung disease include trouble breathing, coughing, wheezing, and discomfort. Your dog may have odd breathing patterns, lethargy, sneezing, restlessness, or collapse.

Treatment:

If you feel like your dog may have one of these diseases, immediately contact a vet. While some of these diseases like lung cancer are not treatable, symptoms can be taken under control so that your dog can live a stable life. Your vet should know how to treat your dog’s exact case of lung disease.

Relation to Halitosis:

Lung diseases affect the dog’s ability to breathe, thus leading to dysfunction in the amount of oxygen that can be passed through the dog’s blood supply. These irregularities may be the cause of the halitosis in your dog.

Image Credit: GlacierTim and VerseVend on Flickr